Monday, October 16, 2006

Rain never stops play

If you're fortunate enough to be a native of one of those "truly civilised" countries, and then unfortunate enough for your national cricket team to play a test series in England, you will know only too well the phrase "rain stopped play". You have had to mourn as your team is forced to "draw" a match with an England team that would surely have been beaten to pulp by your fast bowlers (or outspun by Warne, if you're an aussie).

Well Joel and I have the perfect antedote to the pouring rain - "back lane rain cricket".

The autumn rains finally hit yesterday after a glorious summer, and we have a puddle that extends the whole 22 yards (the length of a wicket for all you Canadians .. the wicket being the length of grass between the two sets of wickets .. and a wicket is not the place you line up to get money in a bank .. it's the stumps and bails .. oh forget it, why do I bother trying to explain this!).

Anyway, picture a long puddle in the pouring rain. Joel stands in one end of it fully clothed in his rain gear and wellingtons (gum boots). Tom then obtains a windfall apple from the neighbours' tree, paces out, and begins the run in. He reaches the end of the puddle, firmly planting his left foot to cause an almighty splash. Over goes the arm to release a ball at 115 km/h, pitching just ahead of joel. The apple makes another almighty splash covering Joel. Much hilarious giggling from both boys.

It is a shame that Liz was not feeling so well, and the rain prevented photographic evidence. It was perhaps a little unfair not to give Joel a bat even for modest defence.

A sodden cyclist chooses to pass us in the lane. "teaching your boy about the joy of puddles, eh?". My reply: "he already knows all about joy, he's teaching me." That's my boy summed up.

5 comments:

Rosie said...

awwww i miss you guys!!! sounds adordable

MattCrossman said...

9. Suspension of play for adverse conditions of ground, weather or light
(a) (i) All references to ground include the pitch. See {error}.
(ii) For the purpose of this Law and {error} only, the batsmen at the wicket may deputise for their captain at any appropriate time.

(b)If at any time the umpires together agree that the condition of the ground, weather or light is not suitable for play, they shall inform the captains and, unless
(i) in unsuitable ground or weather conditions both captains agree to continue, or to commence, or to restart play,
or (ii) in unsuitable light the batting side wishes to continue, or to commence, or to restart play,
they shall suspend play, or not allow play to commence or to restart.

(c) (i) After agreeing to play in unsuitable ground or weather conditions, either captain may appeal against the conditions to the umpires before the next call of Time. The umpires shall uphold the appeal only if, in their opinion, the factors taken into account when making their previous decision are the same or the conditions have further deteriorated.
(ii) After deciding to play in unsuitable light, the captain of the batting side may appeal against the light to the umpires before the next call of Time. The umpires shall uphold the appeal only if, in their opinion, the factors taken into account when making their previous decision are the same or the condition of the light has further deteriorated.

(d) If at any time the umpires together agree that the conditions of ground, weather or light are so bad that there is obvious and foreseeable risk to the safety of any player or umpire, so that it would be unreasonable or dangerous for play to take place, then notwithstanding the provisions of (b)(i) and (b)(ii) above, they shall immediately suspend play, or not allow play to commence or to restart. The decision as to whether conditions are so bad as to warrant such action is one for the umpires alone to make.
The fact that the grass and the ball are wet and slippery does not warrant the ground conditions being regarded as unreasonable or dangerous. If the umpires consider the ground is so wet or slippery as to deprive the bowler of a reasonable foothold, the fielders of the power of free movement, or the batsmen of the ability to play their strokes or to run between the wickets, then these conditions shall be regarded as so bad that it would be unreasonable for play to take place.

(e) When there is a suspension of play it is the responsibility of the umpires to monitor the conditions. They shall make inspections as often as appropriate, unaccompanied by any of the players or officials. Immediately the umpires together agree that conditions are suitable for play they shall call upon the players to resume the game.

(f) If play is in progress up to the start of an agreed interval then it will resume after the interval unless the umpires together agree that conditions are or have become unsuitable or dangerous. If they do so agree, then they shall implement the procedure in (b) or (d) above, as appropriate, whether or not there had been any decision by the captains to continue, or any appeal against the conditions by either captain, prior to the commencement of the interval.

darian said...

so good having you out at campusfire this year...look forward to working with you on the canadian national youth workers stuff...
d

tommy : s said...

erm. matt, thanks for the helpful addition. although all it's really done is confirm to us all that cricket is a somewhat complicated sport.

For our N American readers: baseball is to cricket what checkers is to chess.

MattCrossman said...

Might I take this moment to mention that the teams in england are based on geographical location - Counties. AndLancahsire is the rainiest county of the lot, bein on the western side of the country facing the atlantic.

This means that despite being the strongest team on paper for the last two seasons, we have lost nearly 600 overs playing time to rain. This is essentially like like playing one game lezs than everyone else, but the effect is more widespread. On three occasions we were in winning positions only to see the rain pour down and a draw occur.

Im not bitter.